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Full text of "Today's Wood Worker 1997/1"

I7i 



WOODWORKER 



® 



1 997 - Issues 49-54 




January/February 
Volume 9, Number 1 




July/August 
Volume 9, Number 4 




March/April 
Volume 9, Number 2 




September/October 
Volume 9, Number 5 



Z TODAY'S 

n WOODWORKER 




May/June 
Volume 9, Number 3 



igs 



Build an Atitiqu p Sewing Hactii ne- Cabinet 



WOODWORKER 




November/December 
Volume 9, Number 6 




America's leading woodworking authority" 



Goto 

Disc Homepage 



Goto 

Content Search 



The dream Router Table - the top comes off and goes to the job site! 
Build a modern classic: Our roomy CD Cabinet handles 120 compact discs 
Lessons in split mortises: A Maple Bench and an old-fashioned Dry Clamp 



I 



P 



issue 49 



WOODWORKER 

PROJECTS, TIP SAND TECHNIQUES 



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18 Volt, 1/2" A | Clutch 

ordless Saw 
Combo Pack 





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P7T77H». 

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//DW423K 

5" Random Orbit Variable Speed 

Palm Sander With Case 



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//DW321K 

V.S. Heavy Duty 

Jig Saw Kit 






I'TV.'/iViI 

§£.■ ^OSo 33 f 



#DW621 
2 HP Heavy Duty 
VS Electronic 
Plunge Router 




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Or Fax Your Order. 24 Hours A Day 1-800-343-4205 




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Ask for details. 



EconomyTwoDay SH servteefor $5.00 More! EUJ UDS S!S2@, 

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Today's Ylfeodworker JanJFebruary • 








Serving You 



PORTERCHBLE 

Nib Waudwortosr'S Chuice 



Protile fiP 

Sander Kit 

$114 

333 5" Quicksand dslls saiitfer79 
332 5" Quicksand PSA sands 74 

334 5" dustless PSA sander 79 
97355 5" vs sander w/casc 145 
97366 6" vs sander w/case 149 
0/l25fl4 

V-2-1/2" Finish 
Nailer Kit 

$249 

FN250A16g 2-1/2"fnsh nail kl 209 
FN2Q0 16o 2" linish nailer kil 169 
BN200 lig 2" finish nail kit 149 
BN 12518c 1 -1/4 "finish nail kl 99 
NS10018C WfcNMI slplr fct 99 
NS15018Ba1-1/2"linishslplr169 
FC350 2 ■ 3-1/2" clip hd nailBr329 
FR3S0 2 - 3-1/2" lull hd nailer329 
352VS 
3x21 VS 
Belt Sander 
$165 

i^Ui tool triggered uacuum 269 

556 pfalc joinlerw/cs& Ince 139 

360 3x24 sander with bag 214 

362 4x24 sandier with bag 219 

9853 1 2v 3/8"vsr drl kl w 2 M 1 59 

9862 1 2v 3/8" dr hil w/2 bat 174 

743K 

Leil Hand 7-1/4. 

15 Amp Saw 

w/Case 

$129 

347K RH 7-1/4 saw w/case 129 
843 LH 7-1/4" saww/brk 144 
7310 laminate Irirnmer 104 

906S0K 
1-1/2 HP 
Router w/Case" 

$159 1J SBL 

97310 larainale trimmer kil 199 
511 lock installation kil 159 

9345 6" Saw Boss kil 134 

9314 4-1/2" trim saw til 169 
7539 
3-1/4 HP 
5 Speed 

Plunge Router •3hb» 
$274 

7116 24" Omni jigSvideo 309 
691 1-1/2 Up D handle router 164 
rotiter-shaper table 144 
697 router table w/rouler 234 
7403 painl remcwer 179 

9737PK 

Quick Change. 
Tiger Saw Kit\ ~~°2Sb 
$164 F^Sf*- 

7499 WewcVHiuttoo! 69 

97549 lop handle vs jigsaw 144 
693 1-1/2 hp plunge router 164 







aa DELTA 



22-540 
12" Portable 
Planer 

& Extra Knives 
$359 

31-780 osc spindle sandr 194 
36-250 10" sliding comp. 499 
36-210 10" empd mlr saw 219 
28-190 12" bandsaw w/sland 399 
11-990 12" bench drill press 189 
46-700 12" vs wood lalbe 469 
43-505 mul.u.'sl;.,;: 51 299 

11-090radial drill press w/std 389 
14-650 mortising machine_249 
37-070 

Jointer ^fBWw^ 
$259 

40-650 Mew 18" vs scroll saw479 
40-540 18" vs scroll saw 189 
40-560 16" 2 spaed scrll saw 174 
31-460 4x36 belt/disc sander 134 
23-700 wet/dry grinder 159 

11-950 8" bench drill press 129 
36-540 10" bench saw 179 



freud 



FT-200BE Ujf 
3.25 HP ii al- 
l's Router U . ,T1 
$179* Tgj 

JS102 joining sys cs 8 to 149' 

TR-215 8-1/2" si comp saw 299' 

' Price Afler Mail-In Rebale 





BIESEMEYER 



78-900 

50" Commercial 
w/12" Lett 
$329 

78-934 52" bomesfiop fnc 279 
78-931 40" homeshop fnc 269 
78-930 28" bontashop tnc 249 



HITACHI 



C8FB2 

8-1/2" Compound "5$.,* 

mtre Saw 

$499 

C10FS NewlO" slide qind 739 
DN10DVK vs 9,6v R.A. drill 179 
M12V 3-1/4 hpvs pi router 199 



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10-32 PLUS 
16" - 32" Bench 
Drum Sander 
$399 

22-44 pro stationary sdr 1799 
SuperMax-25 25"d dr sdr 3199 
SuperMax37x2 37"ddrsdr 3899 




Three Stage Turbine 
High Volume 
Low Pressure 
Sprayer 
$599 




kP 



BOSCH 



1587VSK 
Top Handle 
Jig Saw w/Case 
$159 

15B4VSK barrel jigsaw w/cs 159 
15871/3 New lop Mle jigsw 139 
1584VS barrel grip Clic jigsw 139 
3107OVSNEW -a 

5" Dustless Randoni^~S-j 
Orbital Sander ^J. sgt 
$99 ^g 

361 OK 14.4 voll drill w/2 batt 194 
3107DVSK 5" rdm sndr kit 119 
3310K I2vThndlw/2bat174 
1276DVS 4x24 us bell sndr 219 
3270DVS 3x21vs sndr w/bag 164 
1 6 1 5EVS 3-1/4HPplrouler2B9 
11224VSF 7/8" Bulldog hmr 224 
1613EVS 
2 HP, VS, 
Mleroftne 
Plunge 
Router 
$209 

B4050 In-line jigsaw 119 

329CK 3-1/4" planer kit 179 

B7000 cenler detail sander 74 

B7001 vs corner detail sndr 94 

3725QVS 5"vs HSL sander 144 

37270VS 6"vs H&L sender 149 




MSXE-S36-2 
VS Triangular Oscillating 
Sander w/Case 
& Paper / 
$199 



SENCO 



SFN49 

1-1/210 2-1/2 
Finish Nailer 

$389 

SN325+ 60-12D nailer 419 

SFN-IPIus 1"-2" finish ntr 349 
SU60 New full hd slick nlr 449 
SLP-20 5/8"-1-5/8" br nil kit 279 
SLS20 New linish slplr w/cs 249 
SKS 1/4" crown linish slplr 279 





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LS1811 

10" Compound 
Miter Saw 
$429 

609SDWE 9.6v vsr dr w/2 bal 124 

5O07NBK 7-1/4" saw w/cs 119 

2708W 8-1/4" Ibl saw w/br 309 

2012 12" portable planer 499 

361 2C New3hp pi router 269 

LS121112" cmpnd miter sw 779 

6311DWHE12vhicapkt2bl 179 

9820-2 blade sharpener 214 

N1900B 3-1/4" planer w/cs 134 

3901 New plate joiner 199 



SAME DAY 
SHIPPING 



Panasonic 



EY0100EQKWL 
12 V, 3/8, 21 
Position Clutch 
Kit w/2 Ironman 



$194 




ftdwujte & 



Variable Speed 8F|J 
Super Sawiatl Ijr^^f^jW 
$169 feii^ 

6491 10"uiitersw/clbl&han 329 

6494 (tew 10" comp. saw 319 

6496-6 10" slide comp. saw 589 

6497-6 10" Slide saw w/accy 649 

O408-6 12v vsr cdls kil 174 

0234-1 1/2"wst 0-850 mgnm 134 

0236-1 1/2" drill w/case 149 

6368 7-1/4" saw w/cs £ fc 139 



DEWALT 




DW938K 

18 Voll Cordless 



Saw Kit 
$249 

DW935K-2 14.4 cdls saw kil 239 
DW625 — { 

3 HPVS , l^lL 

Plunge Router %M t' + l 

$279 mm 

DW621 Jlip vs plunge router 219 
DW670 laminate Irirnmer 99 
□W673K laminate Irirnmer kil 169 
DW7B5KNEW! jU 
12" Compound '/J 
Miter Saw ■> N 
$399 fcjg 
DW321K vs iigsaw with ease 154 
DW364 7-1/4" saw w/brake 164 
DW361 7-1/4" saw w/brake 109 
DW675K3-W|>l3rl»rW(:;.5i' 164 
DW6B2K 
Plate Joihler\\ LJM 




Kil 



$199 

DW106 3/8 4 amp keyless drtl 74 
DW2S0 0-4000 dry wall drivr 89 
DW2S4 0-2500 deck scrwttrivf 89 
DW280Kallporpscrwdrvrkit119 
DW421K 

5" Hook & Loop Dustless 
Random ti§P= 

Sander w/Case 

$74 

OW423K5"vs rndm sander w/cs94 
OW443 6" RA K&L rdm sndr 144 
OW411 1/4 sheel sndr w/bag 59 
OW431 3"x2rvs bell sander 189 
DW995K . ^s- 

18 Volt 1/2" <<H -T i f >J 
VSR Drill Kil 3V 

$229 WW 

OW991K-22 14,4v3/8"dv/tlr k219 
OW991KS-214.4y drlil/saw kt 349 
DW972K-2 12v3/3vsrdr. 2 bl 184 



aa DELTA 



35-900 

3 HP Special\ : 
Unlsaw w/52"}' r^ 
Unilenee ^ 
& Motor Cover 
$1699* 



Hours: 
M-F7:00-7:OOCST 
Sat. 8:00 - 4:00 CST 





36-820 3hp uni 52"unil Scv1599 
36-830 3hp unisaw 30"tmit 1499' 
36-8213hp unisww/50" Bies1599 
36-B3l3lipii(iisww/30 ,, Bies1499 
34-7735bp unisaw w/52"uni1849 
34-445 10' 
Contractor 
Saw w/30' 
tlniltmce 
$799* 

36-460 10" conl saw 28"BiBs729' 
36-470 1 0" conl saw 40"8ies769' 
36-480 10" conl saw 52"Bies799' 
34-444 10" contractor's saw 649 
34-555 sliding fable allacb 329 
36-275 8- 1/4" bnch table saw 269 
28-280 
14"1HP 
Bandsaw 
$749* 

28-275 14"3/4hpbandsaw589' 
33-055 B-Wsawbuck w/legs619 
37-154 6" iumtetw/stand 1224' 
I7-SOD16-1/2" floor drill press429 
34-08D 10" milre saw 219 

23-710 sharpening center 174 
37-350^1 
8" Jointer 
w/Stand 

$1549* 
43-355 l-1/2hpwoodshaper749 
43-379 3hplKl2spdshapr1699 
31-730 6"bell/12"disc sand r 1349 
33-890 1 2" rad ial arm sawl 599 
33-990 10" radial arm saw 799 
35-220 

10" Compound 
Mitre Saw 

$209 

50-179 3/4 hp dust collector 399 

36-906 52" Delta nnifence 329 

36-905 30" Delta nnifence 249 

32-100 plale jointer 279 

22-B75K 

15" 

Planer 

$1149* 
37-190 6" jointer w/sland 499 
36-850 1 phase stock feeder 499 
32-325 13 spind boring uracil 999 
31-280 

Sanding Center 
With Stand 

$799 

36-755 10" cabinel saw 1149 
36-751 10" cab w/30" unil 1299 
36-752 10"cabw/50"unil 1399 
50-001 
3 HP, 230V 
Cyctnne 2 Stage 
Dust Collector 

$1849 
50-902 5hp3pb cycle collectr1949 
50-903 5fip23Qy r.ycln colctr2249 

'Price Afler Mail-in Rebale 







AM78-HC4V 

1-1/2 HP Vertical ^£S«x 

Twin Tank <?'>*.£ 

$309 ^m 1, 

AM79-HC4V1-t/2h|i vert comp329 
K15A8P 1.5hp wheelbarrow 619 
K5HGA-8P Slip Honda whlb 769 
045 3/B"x50'Goodyear hose 20 



JET 



JTAS-10X 
10" Jet Saw ^ 
3HPW/50" 1 
XACTA Fence H 'e \ 
& Motor Covert? 
$1399 

JTAS-10LX50-13hp 111 tilt SW1699 
JWCS-IOJF 2 hp sw. Jet tnc 959' 
JPM-13 13" pianr/moulder 779' 
JWP-12 12" portable planer 364' 
JWS-18HD 1]ipwoodshaprSD4' 
JWTS-10JF 'S'^SB^^^ 
10" Saw W^jgW^ 
w/Jel Fence R| 
$679* pjl 

JWBS-14CS1 4"1 bp wd bdsw559* 
JWBS-140S14"3/4bp w bsw479* 
JDP-17MF 17"ll16spdr pr4B9' 
JJ-SCSX ^-^: i 

6" Long <, r %r?§ 

Bed Jointer \-i]J\ 

$469* 
JJ-BCS 8" long bed jointer 1189 
JWL-1 236 12"vs wood lalbe 569 
JWP-15H0 15"3hpwplnr 999' 
DC-650 

1HP.650CFM ■ ^ 
Dust Collector PW 

$214* USS, 

OC-12O0 2ltp120Ocfmcflectr429' 
OC-I9O0 31ip1900 cfrn clleclr 619 

JSG-66" bell/12" disc sander 599 
'Price Afler Mail-In Rebale 




1500700 
SB Saw 3 HP 
w/50" Accu-Fence 
$1999 

1270100 #27shpr3hp1ph 2099 
161005D 8"jnlr 1.5 bp 1pil 1699 
1 79 1 21 64 Artisan v/fflcc u 749 
179121164 Artisanw/5D"Accu 849 
179120B osc. spndle sndr 299 
1791209 New 15" planer 1329 
1791051 6"joinler v//sland 549 
1791070 1-1/2 hp dust col 399 



To Order or lor Technical Support Call TOLL-FHll 

®D(MSS§-tM 

Ban 14040 . Grand Forks, ND • 5820B-404D 



FeeGsj' 



m 



Tc [lay's Wooilwtj^cr Jan.'Kcb. 



MOST PORTABLE TOOLS 
SHIPPEO FEO-SX 

$SMnmnE 

FAX US YOUR OHDEH! 
1-800-343-4205 

Any compatible National ad in Oils f'sstie. 
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pmilCB and slack. Llmiietf lo slock on hand. 



w®(dh (BmaiB 



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m& 



OF THE NORTH 



' FULL LINE DISTRIBUTOR " FREE FREIGHT IN 48 CONTIGUOUS USA « FACTORY AUTHORIZED SERVICE « ERRORS AND PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANCE •• 



TODAY'S 



WOODWORKER 

PROJECTS, TIPS AND TECHNIQUES 




22 Dry Assembly Clamp 

Create an extra pair of hands in (lie 
shop with this old-fashioned damp. 



DEPARTMENTS 

5 On The Level 

Lessons in split mortises, shop 
projects and a real stumper. 

6 Tricks of the Trade 

Measuring shop humidity; a 
secure straightedge and a drill 
press drum sander jig, 

7 Shop Stumpers 

Can you help a reader identify 
this woodworking tool? 

8 Hardware Hints 

A new folding/sliding cabinet 
door system that's easy to 
install ... and saves space. 

28 What's In Store 

A why-did n't-I-fhink-of-that 
solution, re- engineered finish 
nailers and Spielman's latest. 

29 Classified Marketplace 

Check out some terrific deals. 

30 End Grain 

Challenging projects from the 
Bahamas; why Spanish cedar? 



Safety First 

Learning how to properly operate 
power and hand tools is essential for 
developing safe woodworking practices. 
For purposes of clarity, necessary safety 
guards have been removed from the 
equipment shown in some of the photos 
and illustrations in Today's 
Woodworker. We in no way 
recommend using this equipment 
without safety guards and urge readers 
to strictly follow manufacturers' 
instructions and safety precautions. 




24 CD Storage Cabinet 

By Stan Schmidt 

Here's a roomy wall-hung unit that stores 

up to 120 compact discs. 



0P 



is Split Mortise Bench 

By Greg Wood 

This study in fine craftsmanship features 

split mortises and pinned tenons. 



10 The Dream 
Router Table 

By Rick White 
It's not just a router 
table, it's a multi- 
functional routing 
system. You get a 
portable top unit, fold- 
up wings for larger 
projects and a hidden 
wheel system for easy 
mobility. Did we 
mention built-in dust 
collection? 




JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1997 

Vol. 9, No. 1 (Issue 49) 



LARRY N. STOIAKEN 
Editor hi Chief 

JOHN KGLL1HER 

AH Director 

STAN SCHMIDT 

Editor 

SIEVE WttSEXMER 

Associate Art Director 

JOHN ENGLISH 
Associate Editor 

NANCY A. AMM END 
Production Manager 

JEFFJACOBSON 
Technical ftltisirator 

GORDON HANSON 
Copy Editor 

DAN JACORSON 
Project Designer 



ANN ROCKLER JACKSON 
Publisher 

DEB HOLM 
Gratia tion Manager 

JILLARENS 

Production Assistant 



NORTON ROCKLER, RICK WHITE. 

STEVE KROHMER, ALWOLEORD 

Editorial Adnisois 



TOM CASPAR, MIKE McGLYNN. 
RICHARD STARR 
Contributing Editors 

■ 

ADVERTISING SALES 

WALTER CHRISTIE 

Advertising Director 

Phone: 770-569-7377; Fax: 770-569-7383 

Midwest, Lisa Kollander, phone: fil 2-929-713;;; 

Fax: <il2-92!)-249K. Central Stairs, Beth 

Sullivan, phone: 312-578-8120: Fax: 312-578- 

8122. West Coast. Richard Railton, phone: 714- 

589-6211; Fax: 714-589-6933. East Coast, Peter 

May, phone: 203-637-54 78; Fax: 203- 698- 1725. 

SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES 

G12-4 788212 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 

612-478-8305 or 612478-8232 

Today's Woodworker, (ISSN: 1041-8113) is 
published in January, March, May, July, 
September, November by Rockier Press, 
4365 Willow Dr., Medina, MN 55340. 
Postage paid at Medina, MN and additional 
mailing offices. 

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 
Today's Woodworker. 4365 Willow Dr, 
Medina, MN 55340. 

One-year subscription, $19.95 (U.S. and 
possessions); $25.95 U.S. funds (Canada 
and other countries). Single copy price, $4.95 
(U.S. and possessions); $5.95 (Canada/other 
countries). Send new subscriptions to Today's 
Woodworker, 4365 Willow Dr, Medina, MN 
55340. Submit project proposals, lips and 
techniques to Today's Woodworker, Box 261, 
Medina, MN 55340-0261. 

Reproduction wilhout permission of the 
publisher is prohibited. © 1997, Rockier Press, 

E-MAIL: edilor@todayswoodworker.com 
WEB SITE: http://todayswoodworker.com 



ON THE LEVEL 



A Fresh Look at an 



A few months ago, while choosing 
the projects for this issue, I was 
struck by the fact that two distinct 
pieces featured the same approach 
to a favorite old joint, the through 
mortise. While most of us are famil- 
iar enough with the standard 
method for cutting through mortises 
(drill, chisel ... chisel some more!), 
the split mortise is ati easier option 
that achieves the same - and often 
better - results, 

Minnesota craftsman Greg Wood, 
while building his maple bench (see 
page 18), tips stock down the middle 
and then removes half the mortise 
from each piece. When he reglues 
the ripped halves, he creates a per- 
fect through mortise and does so in a 
matter of minutes. But time isn't the 
only issue here: When you create a 
mortise, you're counting on the 
tenon shoulders to cover any mis- 
cues. With a through mortise you're 
not afforded that luxury on the side 
where the tenon exits. This is where 
the split mortise can elevate all of 
our woodworking to the next level. 

John English used the same tech- 
nique to create the jaws of his dry 
assembly clamp on page 22. This is a 
reproduction of an antique clamp 
that he discovered at a Wisconsin 
flea market, and it's a great produc- 
tion project: You can build a full set 
of these handy helpers using hard- 
wood from your scrap bin. 

-H- # M 

We featured Rick White's router 
table way back in issue 13 and have 
held off from presenting another 
until we felt we had enough fresh 
ideas to improve the old model. Two 
things we were determined to bring 
to the table were portability and dust 
collection, f think you'll agree that 
our multi-functional routing system 
will be a major asset to your shop. 

In fact, that's what Stan Schmidt 
said when he borrowed it (that's Stan 
on page 10) to build the CD cabinet. 
This wall-mounted unit features some 
pretty innovative hardware (see 
Hardware Hints on page 8). 




Richard Gould's ti'A'ii 
(unidentified wooden 
object). 



One of the most rewarding parts of 
this job is checking out all the mail 
from our readers. The mailbag is 
usually full of photographs, shop tips, 
project suggestions and so on. 
However, 
Richard Gould 
of Washington, 
D.C. surprised 
us this month: 
He sent us this 
50-year-old 
wooden tool, in 
hopes that one 
of our more 
experienced 
readers could 
help him identi- 
fy it. Richard's 
pretty sure it's a 
woodworking 
tool because it 
once belonged to his uncle, a carpen- 
ter who plied his trade during the 
'40s and '50s. If you think you can 
help, see Shop Stumpers on page 7 
for more information. 

I, H II 

Although woodworking is steeped 
in tradition, we're not adverse to a lit- 
tle bit of high tech every now and 
then. If you use a computer, you're 
probably familiar with our World 
Wide Web site. You're not alone: 
Over 1,000 woodworkers visit our 
home page every week! So, if you're 
looking for a conduit to the world of 
cyber-woodworking, check out our 
site (we're now linked to over 225 
other woodworking home pages) . 
And if you happen to provide a ser- 
vice or product that other readers 
may find interesting, give Jill Arens a 
call at 612478-8805 for information 
about our low cost Classified Market- 
place on the Web. 

Finally, I hope your family and 
friends all enjoyed those hand-crafted 
wooden gifts you made. It's never too 
early to get started on next year's list, 
so without fur- 
ther ado, let's 
head out to the 
shop ... 



y^i iVSfei*^- 



January/February 1997 Today's Woodworker 



TRICKS OF THE TRADE 



Cutting Small Stock and Checking Humidity 



Clipboard 
clip 



Back-up board 




Small Stock Miter Gauge Clamp 

Trying to hold small pieces of wood 
steady against the miter gauge of 
either a table or band saw can be 
tricky. I've found the stout spring 
and wide jaws of a clipboard clip pro- 
vide a slick way to grip little pieces. 
To make a clamp, all you need to 
do is attach the clip to a block of 
wood, which in turn is screwed onto 
your miter gauge. For more versatili- 
ty, rout grooves in the block and use 
wing nuts to attach the clip. This lets 
you raise or lower the unit to adjust it 
for various sized pieces of stock. A 
scrap back-up block should be used 
to reduce tear out. 

R.B. Himes 
Vienna, Ohio 

Substitute Work Supports 

In a bind while cutting a 4' x 8 1 sheet 
of plywood with no work supports? I 
was in that situation once when I 
noticed my wife's ironing board 
hanging in the corner. I figured, why 
not? It's smooth, inexpensive and 
easily accessible since almost every- 
one owns one. 

I got a great laugh from a fellow 
woodworker when I told him what I 
use for a work support. He wished 
he'd thought of it before buying his 
work support, so he could have spent 
the money on another accessory 
instead, 

Joseph Roberge 

Brown Mills, New Jersey 



PICK OF THE TRICKS 



Low humidity mark 



High humidity 
mark 




Humidity Stick 

I build and repair fine furniture for a 

living, and tracking humidity levels 
in my shop is critical to my success. 
A few years ago, I edge-glued several 
short lengths of 1" x 2" red oak 
together, then attached a strip of 
3/4" x 2" hard maple to one end of 
the resulting block. Ever since then, 
once eveiy week, I mark the other 
end's location on the piece of maple. 
I now have a track record of the 
humidity in my shop (that tells me 
what times of the year highs and 
lows occur) and an instant reference 
that can be checked on any day. 

Tom Caspar 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 



0> PRINT THIS ARTICLE 

MP MAC USERS SEE "READ ME" FIU- 



Wrap that Magnet in a Paper Towel 

Every woodworker has occasion to 
drill, tap, fde or ream steel or iron. A 
magnet does a good job of picking up 
steel particles generated by these 
operations, but how do you remove 
the particles from the magnet? I 
found that I get a clean magnet if I 
first wrap it in a tissue or paper towel. 
Simple and inexpensive! 

Harold Keenan 
Danbury, Connecticut 




No-Slip Straightedge 

I finally got tired of my straightedge 
slipping and spoiling a cut. So I 
simply drilled several holes in it, 
each the exact size of a metal push- 
pin shank. Now I pin the straight- 
edge directly to the workpiece. In 
most cases, the sharp point of the 
push-pin leaves such a small hole 
that it is not noticeable. 

Michael Burton 
Glorieta, New Mexico 

Large Cabinet, Small Workshop 

Protecting wood surfaces while sand- 
ing a large assembled cabinet can 
pose quite a challenge. I place scrap 
pieces of 24 "x 48" acoustical ceiling 
tile (the type that doesn't have a hard 
surface) on the floor, but the tile 
could just as well be placed on a 
workbench. This gives me a protec- 
tive surface upon which I can place 
the sides, back and front while I'm 
sanding. 

Tom Palubecki 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 




SHOP STUMPERS 



Unidentified Wooden 




Drum Sander Jig 

When using a sanding drum in the 
drill press, the sandpaper at the bot- 
tom always wears out before the 
upper portion. To remedy this, I 
made a sanding box (out of 3/4" par- 
ticle board) that damps to the drill 
press table. 

Using a scroll saw, I cut a 3U n 
diameter hole in the top of the box to 
accommodate my 3" diameter drum. 
I then drilled a VA" hole in the bot- 
tom of the box to accommodate my 
1" diameter drum. Size yours to fit 
youi - needs, and make the sides of 
your box tall enough to match the 
length of your sanding drums. 

To use your new jig, clamp the 
sanding box to the drill press table 
and lower the drum slightly below 
the box top. Then set the quill and 
sand away. When that portion of 
sandpaper is worn out, lower the 
drum into the box, reset the quill 
and keep sanding. You could, of 
course, raise the table instead of low- 
ering the drum. 

Martha Dawson 
Squaw Valley, California 



Today's Woodworker pays from 
$40.00 (for a short tip) to $150.00 (for 
Pick of the Tricks) for all Tricks of 
the Trade published. Send yours to 
Today's Woodworker, Dept. T/T, P.O. 
Box 261, Medina, MN 55340. E-mail: 
editor® todays woodworker, com. 



QCan you help me identify litis 
woodworking tool (below and 
at right)? It belonged to my 
uncle who was a carpenter from 
about 1940 to 1960. You can barely 
make out the word "—- Bet/el" on 
the lop. it would appear that a blade 
or metal tool of some sort was 
clamped into the block, but the tool 
may nol have been used like a plane. 
Since there would be no restraint 
against the blade, perhaps it was 
used by pulling or pushing the long 
face across the work, like a scraper. 
Richard Gould 
Washington, D.C. 





f\ Although the Today's 
fl Woodworker office is full of 
avid woodworkers, nobody 
could definitively identify Richard's 
treasure. However, several theories 
were offered. One of the more 
promising guesses is that this is 
the handle of a tool to which differ- 
ent bases were attached. In thai 
case, each of the bases would have 
been in the shape of a different pro- 
file, and the tool could have been 
used to sand moldings. If any of our 
readers can help Richard identify 
this family heirloom, please let us 
know: Our e-mail and postal 
addresses are listed below. 

■ 

Send your Shop Stumpers to 
Today's Woodworker, P.O. Box 
261, Medina, MN 55340. Or e-mail: 
editor@todayswoodworker.com 



Qls there a difference in the 
shellac flakes in a one-pound 
cut versus a three- or tour- 
pound cut? The only cut I have been 
able to find is one-pound. I followed 
the directions, but it produced shel- 
lac that I thought was too thick. I then 
reduced the amount of alcohol in the 
mixture to produce one I thought was 
acceptable. Which is better, to con- 
tinue using less alcohol in the one- 
pound cut, or try to find an outlet for 
three- or four-pound cut? 

Jim Height 
Big Rapids, Michigan 

A If you're buying shellac 
flakes, you're responsible 
for the cut. "Pound cut," 
according to Kevin Southwick, 
finishing expert and assistant 
manager of The Woodworkers" 
Store in Minnetonka, Minnesota, 
refers to the weight of the shellac 
flakes in relation to the volume of 
alcohol. One pound of shellac flakes 
and one gallon of denatured alcohol 
produce a one-pound cut. Three 
pounds of flakes and one gallon of 
alcohol produce a three-pound cut. 

Shellac mixture is a matter of 
personal preference. Southwick 
personally uses Impound cut most 
of the time. "I might have to put on 
more coats, but each goes on 
smoother with fewer negative 
effects. I feel that's a fair tradeoff to 
get a better finish." 

Southwick also says it's a good 
idea to buy fresh flakes or liquid 
shellac that's nol outdated. 



Today's Woodworker January/February 1997 



HARDWARE HINTS 



Protect and Organize Your CD Collection 



By Al Wolford 




The Concertina system controls 
bi-fold cabinet doors with a 
sliding door track. The result is 
sin oath action and lots of 
adjustability. Maxim inn sinyle 
door width is fflP, and the pins 
that ride In the track are spring- 
loaded tor easy removal. 



When Stan Schmidt told me Today's 
Woodworker was starting to design a 
new CD cabinet, the first thing I said 
was "make it big enough and try our 
new Concertina door system." This 
innovative hardware combines the 
action of bi-fold hinges with the con- 
trol of a top-mounted track. 

The complete package includes a 
pair of 120° overlay hinges for the 
edge of the door; two offset butterfly 
hinges for where the panels meet; 
and a Concertina hinge on the top 
inside corner of the door that is 
essentially a baseplate for a pin that 
rides in the track or groove. 

The European style overlay hinges 
can easily support the weight of most 

■ 

Al is the technical service manager at 
The Woodworkers' Store. Send your 
hardware questions or comments to Al 
at Today's Woodworker, Dept. HH, 
P.O. Box 261, Medina, MN 55340. 



cabinet doors, even 
those with glass panels. 
These hinges are 
installed in a boring 
made with a 35mm 
Forstner bit, as are the 
Concertina pins. The 
butterfly hinges are 
simply screwed to the 
inside surface where 
the doors meet. 

Tracking is not abso- 
lutely essential for the 
system since there's no 
load on the top where 
the groove is cut, but it 
does make for a 
much smoother ride. 
(Today's Woodwork- 
er included enough 
in their hardware kit 
for the CD cabinet.) 
It's available in about 
two- and four-foot 
lengths, the former 
being ideal for single 
bi-fold s, while the lat- 
ter is required for double bi-folds. 
Installation of the track is easy: Just 
mill a 16mm {approximately 5/8") 
deep by 20mm (13/16") wide dado 
for it, then secure it in place with the 
provided screws. (Remember, if you 
choose to go trackless, your dado 
has to match the pin dimensions.) 

Installing the overlay and Concerti- 
na hinges can be a little more compli- 
cated. Each of these requires a circu- 
lar bore in the inside door face that is 
created with a Forstner bit installed 
in a drill press. Locations and depths 
of these bores are shown on separate 
instructions that come with the kit. 

One of the best features of this 
system is that the pins in the Con- 
certina hinges are spring loaded. 
That means they are retractable, so 
installing and removing them from 
the track is a simple matter of push- 
ing the pin down. That makes initial 
adjustments fairly simple. 



As long as Stan was building a cab- 
inet for CDs, I also recommended 
some pop-in CD racks that have 
been very popular with my cus- 
tomers. They're available in pairs, 
one left and one right, and are 
installed in a cavity facing each 
other. These pop-in racks are simple 
to install, easy to operate, convenient 
and inexpensive. 

And, they don't just hold the com- 
pact discs; A tiny lip on the front of 
each slot locks the CD in place, so 
your collection is secure. And when 
you want to remove a disc, you can 
pop it out with nothing more than a 
light finger touch. 

Installation is a breeze. Just line up 
the racks with their front edges flush 
with the face of the cabinet. Start the 
screw holes with a scratch awl or 
drill, then simply screw the racks in 
place. You will, of course, have to get 
hold of a short handled screwdriver 
because of the limited space avail- 
able in the cavity. But that's all you'll 
have to find, because each rack 
comes with all the mounting screws 
you'll need to install it. 



This black plastic 

CD holder is simple 

to install and holds 

up to 20 CDs. Its 

only limitation is 

that it can't he 

used horizontally, 

so it doesn't work 

well in drawers, 





On the phis side, removing 
a disc is as easy as 
touching it with a fingertip. 



J a miary/ February 1997 Today's Woodworker 



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Multi-functional 
Routing System 

Here's a router table - complete with its own 
dust collection system - that can be used with 
or without its base. 



By Rick White 




Q PRINT THIS ARTICLE 

4MK MAC USERS SEE "READ ME" FILE 



n issue 13 (Jan- 
uary/February 1991), 
I built a router table for the 
Today's Woodworker shop, 
which has lots of floor space 
and a central dust collection system. 
My own workshop has neither, so I 
designed and built this multi-func- 
tional routing system to overcome 
those drawbacks. With its wings up, 
I can run long stock. With the wings 
down, I can roll the unit up against a 
wall and still use it for most routine 
jobs. Best of all, the top comes off 
and becomes a stand-alone benchtop 
unit that I can take to my northern 
Minnesota cabin when needed. 



Tabletop Core 

The tabletop is the 
most critical element of any router 
table. If it doesn't stay flat, sturdy 
and stable, your milling will not be of 
the best quality. So building the 
tabletop is the first order of business. 
To ensure that my table stayed flat, 
I built the core from two layers of 
Finnish birch plywood. However, a 
less expensive high density fiber- 



board (the same material 
used by cabinet shops for 

countertops) would also work. 

Begin by gluing and clamping two 
sheets of 3/4" thick core stock (26" x 
501^" - large enough to make pieces 1 
and 2) together, exerting enough 
pressure on the center of the panel 
to ensure good adhesion. To do that, 
you can use special clamps with long 
jaws, or you can weigh down the cen- 
ter with sand bags or lead bars. 
Another good idea is to screw the 
two panels together. If you go this 
latter route, screw from the bottom 



January/February 1997 Today's Woodworker 



Router Tabletop Hardware Kit 

This kit includes the hardware 
necessary to build the router 
tabletop: piano hinges, plywood 
edging, miter gauge track, 
T-track, threaded inserts, brass 
knurled knobs, T-bolts and star 
knobs. Router base insert 
options are detailed on page 12. 

A router bit guard also is available: 
To order, call 1-800-610-0583. 




MATERIAL LIST - Top 



1 Tabletop (1) 


TxWxL 

1^"x26"x26%" 


2 Wings (2) 


1^"x26"x 12" 


3 Piano Hinges (2) 


1^"x26" 


4 Edging (2) 


1 %" x 8' Plyedge 


5 Tabletop Laminate (2) 


1/40" x 26%" x 26%" 



6 Wing Laminate (4) 


1/40" x 26%" x 12%" 


7 Miter Gauge Track (1) 


1/2"x1"x26K" 


8 Fence T-track (2) 


1/2" x 13/16" x 15^" 


9 Router Base Insert (1) 


1/4" x 9" x 12" 


10 Gussets (2) 


3/4" x 8" x 8" 


11 Threaded Inserts (8) 


1/4"-20 


12 Brass Knurled Knobs (4) 


1/4"-20 



13 Screws (36) 


#8 x 1 %' 


14 Plugs (36) 


3/8" Diameter 


15 Fence Face and Brace (2) 


3/4' x 3" x 26%" 


16 Dust Collection Port (1) 


2" x 2" x 9" 


17 T-slot bolts (2) 


5/16"-18x1^" 



18 Star Knobs (2) 



5/1 6"- 18 



up with l'/i" screws after drilling 
clearance holes through the bottom 
sheet. The screws will pull the two 
plates together. Use a straightedge 
to check that the assembly is flat. 
After the glue has dried, cut the top 
and wings to size on your table saw. 
Then reset your fence and blade 
height to create the rabbets for the 
hinges (pieces 3) on the four inside 
edges (see the Pinup Shop Draw- 
ings between pages 16 and 17 ). 

Glue and clamp hardwood tape 
(piece 4) to all the edges of the three 
panels except the ones to which the 
hinges will be screwed, using long 
straight pieces of scrap between the 
clamps and the tape to ensure even 
pressure. When the glue is day, sand 
the tape flush with the top and bot- 
tom and move on to laminating the 
top and the wings. 



Table Inserts 

The best options here are either 
clear polycarbonate, or molded 
resin inserts with rings that can 
be popped out for large bits. 
Resin inserts also offer a remov- 
able pin for free-hand routing. 

To install either insert, position 
it on the tabletop (see Pinup 
Shop Drawings) and butt scrap 
stock against its sides. The thick- 
ness of this scrap will be deter- 
mined by the length of the router 
bit you use in the next step, and it 
should also be wide enough to 
support your router. 




Secure the scrap in place with 
two-sided tape, then remove the 
insert. With a router equipped 
with a 1/2" straight bit and a 1/2" 
OD guide bushing, cut a rabbet 
into the top, the same depth as the 
thickness of your insert. Remove 
the scrap guides and cut the rest 
of the hole with a saber saw (leav- 
ing the rabbet intact). The insert 
may need some light sanding for a 
perfect flt. 




Router Table Inserts 

Black phenolic resin router base: 

93394 $39.95 

Clear polycarbonate 12" x 12": 
24935 $14.95 

To order, call 1-800-610-0883. 



Laminating the Tabletop 

Each piece of laminate in the Materi- 
al List (pieces !5 and 6) is deliberately 
oversized by 1/4". This is because 
you'll be using your router to trim it 
to the correct size after it has been 
applied to the top and wings. 

If you used screws to glue up the 
tabletop, fill any depressions and 
sand the filler flush. Then spread a 
coat of contact adhesive on the bot- 
tom surface of each wing and the 
tabletop, following the adhesive man- 
ufacturer's directions. Apply a similar 
coat to the relevant pieces of lami- 
nate. When the cement is dry to the 
touch, lay dowels or thin sticks every 
six inches along the plywood, then 
position the laminate on top of these 
spacers. Remember, you'll only get 
one shot at lining up the laminate - 
contact adhesive is unforgiving. 

When you're happy with the posi- 
tioning, begin removing the spacers 
from the center. Work your way 
toward the ends, pressing the lami- 
nate down firmly as each spacer is 
removed. Use a roller to roll the 
entire surface once all the spacers 
are removed, then use a laminate 
trimming bit in your router to cut the 
laminate flush with the edges of the 
tabletop and wings. When the bot- 
toms of all three panels have been 
laminated, repeat the process on the 
top surfaces. This time, set the 
router bit height so the bearing 
doesn't ride into the hinge rabbets. 

Tabletop Hardware 

Now that your tabletop and wings 
are laminated, you can start machin- 
ing for the hardware that guides the 
fence and miter gauge. The first step 
here is to install the piano hinges 
that hold the wings, then lay the 
entire assembly on a flat workbench. 
Secure it to the bench with clamps, 
then install a 1" straight bit in your 
portable router (if you don't own a 1" 
bit, make several passes with a small- 
er one). Refer to the Pinup Shop 
Drawings for the location of the 
miter gauge groove, then clamp a 
fence in place and rout this groove 
across all three panels at the same 
time. That way, you'll be sure they 
line up properly. 

Install the miter gauge track (piece 
7) in the tabletop next, but don't 



install track in the wing grooves or 
the gauge will get stuck. Predrill and 
countersink for screws to hold the 
track in place, then slip the miter 
gauge from your table saw into the 
track and tighten the screws until it 
slides easily with no play. 

The T-tracks for the fence (pieces 
8) are installed in a similar fashion. 
Cut the grooves according to the 
locations given in the Pinup Shop 
Drawings, then screw the tracks in 
place. The last hardware element in 
the top is the table insert (piece 9), 
and instructions for cutting the rab- 
bet that holds it (shown in Figure 1 ) 
can be found in the sidebar at left. 




Figure 1 : The router table insert rests on a 
rabbet that holds it flush with the tabletop. See 
the sidebar at left for instructions for cutting it. 



Adding Portability 

To use the tabletop as a stand-alone 
unit, the wings serve as legs. They are 
secured in position with a pair of gus- 
sets (pieces 10) that are mortised into 
the back of the tabletop like hinges 
are mortised into doors. This mortise 
(see Pinup Shop Drawings) is cut 
with a routei - equipped with a straight 
bit (after removing the piano hinges) , 
then cleaned up with a chisel. A 
matching mortise is then cut in the 
back of each wing. 

Bore holes in each wing for the 
threaded inserts (pieces 11), and in 
each gusset (see Figure 2 on page 
14) for the knurled knobs (pieces 
12). The Pinup shop Drawings 
locate the holes for the inserts plus 
the screws and plugs (pieces 13 and 
14) that anchor the gussets to the 
tabletop. To secure the wings in the 
down position, pass the brass knobs 
through the holes in the gussets and 
screw them into the inserts. 



January/February 1997 Today's Woodworker 



Router Cabinet Hardware Kit 

This kit includes the hardware nec- 
essary to build the router base cabi- 
net: door edging, piano hinges for 
the doors and gatelegs, catches, 
knobs, plastic leveler glides and 
threaded inserts. 



To order, call 1-800-61 0-0883 




MATERIAL LIST - 


Base 




19 Base Sides (2) 




TxWxL 

3/4" x 23%" x 3214" 


20 Base Back (1) 




3/4" x 23" x 3214" 


21 Base Top (1) 




3/4" x 23" x 23'// 


22 Base Shelf (1) 




3/4" x 2215" x 21%" 


23 Base Bottom (1 )* 




3/4" X 23" X 13" 


24 Side Stiles (4) 




3/8" x 2%" X 32K" 


25 Front & Back Stiles 


(4) 


1/4" x1"x 3214" 


26 Side Rails (2) 




3/8" x 2%" x 18T 


27 Edging (3) 




1/4" x 3/4" x 22'A" 



29 Door Edging (2) 


TxWxL 
3/4" x 96" Tape 


30 Door Hinges (2) 


1 kS" x 30 3 /" Piano 


31 Door Catches (2) 


Double Roller 


32 Door Knobs (2) 


1 %" Diameter 


33 Gatelegs (4) 


3/4" x 9" x 81" 


34 Threaded Inserts (4) 


5/1 6"- 18 


35 Gateleg Levelers (4) 


3/8" x1«" 


36 Gateleg Hinges (4) 


1 if x 9" Piano 



37 Cabinet Feet (4) 



1/4" x 2" x2" 



28 Doors (2) 



3/4" x 11"x30%" 



*lf you decide not to install the wheel system, (see "Getting 
Mobile", page 14), the bottom should measure 23" x 23W. 



The Fence 

Use straight hardwood stock to 
make the fence face and brace 
(pieces 15), then cut a hole in the 
middle of the face (see Pinup shop 
Drawings) for router bits before 
screwing and gluing the two pieces 
together. Counterbore the screw 
heads (they'll be plugged later) , then 
make the dust collection port (piece 
16), a block of wood (see Pinup 
Shop Drawings for profile) with a 
hole drilled in it at an angle: 1 used a 
35mm European hinge bit to fit my 
Shop-Vac's hose. Screw, but don't 
glue, the port to the back of the 
fence behind the hole: You may need 
to replace the fence face sometime. 

The fence is secured to the table- 
top with two T-slot holts (pieces 17) 
and a couple of star knobs (pieces 
18). This hardware also allows you 
to easily move and set the fence. 




Figure 2: Gussets that are mortised into the 
back of the tabletop allow the top to he 
converted Into a portable benchtop unit. 

The Base Cabinet is Next 

Even though it becomes a portable, 
self-contained unit, the tabletop sub- 
assembly is designed so it can rest 
on a mobile base cabinet. This base's 
two sides (pieces 19) are rabbeted 
on their top, bottom and back (see 
the Pinup Shop Drawings for loca- 
tions and dimensions), and these are 
easy cuts to make on your table saw. 
The cabinet back (piece 20) is 
milled next. The only machining 
here is a rabbet along the top edge 
and a large hole (see the Pinup 
Shop Drawings) that will allow air 
to reach the Shop-Vac® and the 
router cord to exit the cabinet. If you 
already have a dust collection sys- 
tem, all you'll need is a hole large 
enough to accept your cord's plug. If 
not, the hole can be cut with a saber 




Figure 3: Pressure sensitive hardwood tape is 
applied to ail four edges of the base unit's 
plywood doors, after which it is sanded flush. 

saw after first drilling out the four 
corners. Finish up by sanding any 
jagged edges left by the saw. 

After you have cut the top, shelf 
and bottom (pieces 21, 22 and 23) to 
size, return to your saber saw to cut 
the hole in the top (see Pinup Shop 
Drawings) for your router. You also 
need to drill a hole in the back of the 
shelf for your router's power cord. 
Note: If you decide not to install 
wheels on your cabinet, the bottom 
should be the same size as the top. 

You can now assemble the top, bot- 
tom and shelf to the sides and back, 
using glue and 1M* screws. The 
screw heads should be sunk 1/4" 
below the surface in 3/8" diameter 
counterbores that are drilled with a 
Forstner bit (for clean edges and a 
flat bottom) . 

Add Some Trim 

There's something about a well-built 
shop fixture (a fine European work- 
bench, for example) that brings plea- 
sure to the most mundane wood- 
working tasks (even sanding) . That's 
why 1 suggest you trim out the 
router table's base cabinet, giving it 
a frame and panel look. The trim 
pieces are simply cut and jointed to 
size, then applied to the cabinet with 
glue and clamps. 

The trim pieces must be applied in 
a specific order so that everything 
fits perfectly. Begin by attaching the 
side stiles (pieces 24), followed by 
the front and back stiles (pieces 25), 
the side rails (pieces 26) and the 
edging (pieces 27) . 



Getting Mobile 

I made the base of my router table 
portable so it can be moved around 
the shop. A pair of 8" diameter 
wheels are mounted on an axle 
(piece 42) that is fashioned from a 
length of 1/2" steel rod. Spring 
clips (pieces 43) secure the wheels 
at the correct locations on the axle 
(see Pinup Shop Drawings) . To 
keep them in place, I cut shallow 
grooves all the way around the 
axle using a hacksaw. Fender 
washers (pieces 44) help reduce 
friction as the wheels turn. 

This wheel and axle assembly 
rides in grooves cut into the axle 
frames (pieces 45). These frames 
are small plywood panels (see 
Pinup Shop Drawings) and are 
slipped onto the axle between the 
inside spring clips, and secured to 
the cabinet with screws. The entire 
wheel system is then enclosed 
behind a wheel retainer panel 
(piece 46), that has two slots cut 
into it to accommodate the wheels. 

To operate the system, tip the 
table backward to engage the 
wheels, and forward to disengage. 
This will allow you to roll the cabi- 
net snug against a wall, tip it 
toward you to disengage the 
wheels, then drop it in place. To 
engage them, simply pull the cabi- 
net out about a foot from the wall, 
then tip it backward and the wheels 
will drop into place. 



Making the Doors 

Flush doors (pieces 28) are simple to 
make and have a low profile. To build 
them, cut plywood panels to the cor- 
rect dimensions and apply pressure 
sensitive hardwood tape (piece 29) 
to all four edges (see Figure 3). 
Sand the tape flush, then dry fit the 
hinges (pieces 30), the catches 
(pieces 31) and the door knobs 
(pieces 32) . Locations for all of these 
can be found on the Pinup Shop 
Drawings. Once all the screw holes 
have been started, you can remove 
the hardware until after the cabinet 
has been finished. 



January/February 1997 Today's Woodworker 



Router Table Wheels 

These plastic wheels are 8" in 
diameter with art 1/2" axle hole. 

To order, call 1-800-610-0883. 




Gatelegs Support the Top 

When working with long stock, this 
router table's two extension wings 
are invaluable. However, it's essen- 
tial that the wings are lined up in the 
same plane as the tabletop. To 
en sure that (hey are, two pairs of 
gatelegs (pieces 33) support them 
when they're in use. 

To make these gatelegs, begin by 
transferring their Full-size Pattern 
onto plywood stock, then move to 
your drill press. Bore a hole in the 
top of each blank for a threaded 
insert (pieces 34). These inserts will 
house plastic leveler glides (pieces 
35) that will allow you to make fine 



MATERIAL LIST - Wheel Assembly 



adjustments to 
the height of the 
wings. Boring 
holes for them is a lot easier to do 
now, before the gateleg profile is cut. 
That's the next step, and it's done on 
your band saw. Then use a drum 
sander in your drill press to refine 
the band saw cuts. 

Install the gatelegs with 9" lengths 
of piano hinge (pieces 36) . The loca- 
tions for these hinges can be found 
on the Pinup Shop Drawings. 
Once they're in place, attach 1/4" 
thick feet (pieces 37) to the four cor- 
ners to keep the bottom of your cabi- 
net off the floor. 



38 Wheels (2) 


TxWxL 

8" Diameter 


39 Lower Shelf (1) 


3/4" x 22%" x10%" 


40 Lower Shelf Support (1 ) 


3/4" x 22%" x 9 


41 Lower Shelf Edging (1) 


1/4" x 3/4" x 22%" 


42 Axle(1) 


1/2" x 22" Steel Rod 


43 Axle Clips (4) 


1/2" ID Spring Clips 


44 Axle Washers (4) 


1/2" ID x 2" OD Fender 


45 Axle Frames (2) 


1/2"x9%"x9" 



46 Wheel Retainer Pane I ( 1 ) 3/4" x 23" x 1 OK" 



Wrap up the base by gluing plugs 
in the screw counterbores. Trim 
these with a chisel and sand flush. 

The same four brass knurled 
knobs that hold the wings in position 
when the router system is being 
used on a benchtop are also used to 
secure the top to the base. Drill 
holes through the top of the base, 
then bore four corresponding holes 
in the underside of the top for the 
threaded inserts (pieces 11). This 
ensures that you'll get a steady, safe 
and non-moving surface. 



Today's Woodworker January/February 1997 




Figure 4: The router table's fence incorporates 
a ttust collection port. Tlie Shop-Vac's hose is 
friction fitted to a hole in this port. 

The Wheel Assemhly 

To make the table mobile (so it can 
be pushed against a wall and moved 
out when needed), I added a pair of 
wheels (pieces 38) . However, if you 
decide that you don't need this 
option, just skip the rest of this sec- 
tion and move on to "wrapping up". 

The wheel system I devised lets 
me tip the table backward to engage 



the wheels, then forward to disen- 
gage. It's enclosed by the lower shelf 
(piece 39) and a support (piece 40). 
These are cut to size, then the lead- 
ing edge of the shelf is trimmed with 
an oak strip (piece 41) . The shelf and 
support are simply screwed in place 
through the sides of the cabinet (see 
the Pinup Shop Drawings for loca- 
tions), and these screws are counter- 
sunk in the same fashion as the ones 
used earlier to attach the base shelf. 

With the enclosure built, you can 
assemble and install the wheel sys- 
tem. Instructions can be found in 
"(ietting Mobile" on page 14. 

Wrapping Up 

After all the assembly is accom- 
plished, you're ready to finish the 
cabinet. I sprayed the base and table- 
top edging with four coats of lacquer, 
sanding between coats. 



If you used a clear polycarbonate 
tabletop insert, remove the existing 
base from your router and mark the 
three screw locations on the insert, 
centering the tool on the new base. 
Drill holes for the screws and coun- 
tersink for the screw heads, then 
attach the router and drop it in place. 
If you used the black plastic resin 
insert, it comes with complete 
mounting instructions. 

The last detail I added was my 5 
gallon Shop- Vac, Closing the doors 
of the cabinet reduces the level of 
noise it makes. Finally, I ran the 
hose out through the air vent in the 
back of the base, and friction fitted it 
to the fence, as shown in Figure 4. 
■ 

Rick White, a professional woodworker, 
serves as an editorial advisor to 
Today's Woodworker. 



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January/February 1997 Today's Woodworker 



ISSUES 



All of our back Issues are stilt available. Volumes 6 through 8 
are shown here and the rest are on the order form or In the 
Sourcebook. Remember, we'll send you a free Today's Wood- 
worker binder If you order six or more back Issues. 




The sanding supply 
cabinet, a self- storing 
doll house, a hand 
mirror and a coat rack. 
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A modular computer 
desk, the 18 wheeler 
for kids, a cherry end 
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A classic oak icebox. 
deck table, adjustable 
band saw fence and a 
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A kid's workbench, a 
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A Slickley hutch, a toy 
tanker Iruck, heirloom 
jewelry box, and a tilt 

table for the drill press. 
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An entertainment 

center, a pencil box, 
tog hauling semi truck, 
and a baker's shelf. 
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lO ; 



WOODWORKER ■ 




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A clamping station, an 
early American dresser 
a wedged tenon spice 
rack and a soup spoon. 
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WOODWORKER 



A biplane coal rack, the 
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a cherry lea table and a 
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A toy car and truck set, 
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The heirloom blanket 
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The Itasca bookcase, a 
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whirligig, a Greene & 
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The gardener's bench, 
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hall table and a router 
surfacing jig. 
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A classic mahogany 
humidor, the LEGOS' 
center and an orienlal 
redwood arbor. 
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A scroll saw blade 
caddy. Ihe 4x4 jeep, an 
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The kaleidoscope, a 
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Look for more back issues on the Order Form 
and in our Sourcebook! 



A traditional filing cabinet, 
the looney whirligig, an 
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A Slickley fern table, an 
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A versatile hobby box, 
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Jigs and Fixtures! 



Two great packages of plans 

from the back issues of 

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magazine. 

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Complete plans for 
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ADVENTO 




Timber framed joinery in the author's 100-year-old 
Minnesota smokehouse provided the inspiration 
for this study in fine craftsmanship. 




here's some- 
thing special 
about mortise 
and tenon join- 
ery. Oh, I know 
that lots of woodworkers feel dove- 
tails are more romantic. But when I 
stand in my 100-year-old smoke- 
house on the shores of Dutch Lake, 
especially during one of our infa- 
mous Minnesota snowstorms, the 
immense strength of the structure's 
mortise and tenon joinery is quite 
reassuring. 

The pegged timber frame joints in 
the building were, in part, the inspira- 
tion for this bench. Though the 
design is simple, its execution may be 
a little more demanding than it looks. 
For example, there are some tight tol- 



By Greg Wood 



erances on the pegged tenon joints 
that hold the stretcher to the legs. 
And the leg tops are angled slightly to 
make the seat more comfortable. 

I've always believed that fine crafts- 
manship should be so in tune with 
design that it takes a while to notice 
that you're looking at something spe- 
cial. That's what I'd like you to expe- 
rience when building this bench. 

Choosing a Wood Species 

I chose hard maple for my bench 
because its understated grain and 
texture complement the simple lines 
of the design. In addition, the bench 
should appear sturdy and functional, 
hence the thick stock used through- 
out. If you have difficulty finding 1^" 
thick material, face-glued 3/4" 



boards will work equally well. If you 
choose to go the latter route, make 
sure that the grain patterns along the 
edges are fairly similar: Visible joints 
may detract from the finished piece. 
Also, use clamps with long jaws and 
stall clamping from the center out, to 
make sure there are no voids in the 
glued-up panel. 

Once you've settled on your wood 
species, it's a good idea to store the 
stock in your workshop for a week or 
two, just to let it acclimate. With the 
precise tenons you'll be milling, it's 
better that you don't have to deal 
with too much shrinkage or expan- 
sion. I also cut all the parts 1/8" over- 
size, then wait another week before 
jointing them to the exact dimen- 
sions in the Material List. 



January/February 1997 Today's Woodworker 



JZh PRINT THIS ARTICLE 

T=P MAC USERS SEE "READ ME' FILE 



Making Mortises the Easy Way 

When I started this project, I figured 
that the biggest challenge would be 
making the large through mortise in 
each leg (piece 1). With visions of 
sharp chisels cracking the HP thick 
hard maple along its grain, I began 
to search for a better way than drill- 
and-chisel. What I came up with was 
a technique (see Figure 1) appropri- 
ately borrowed from timber framers. 
I simply ripped each leg's middle 
board down the center, removed half 
the mortise (see the Pinup Shop 
Drawings between pages 16 atid 17 
for dimensions) from each side using 
my table saw's dado head, then 
reglued the board. 

Each of these reassembled middle 
pieces then became the center of a 
16%" wide panel, which in turn 




Figure 1: The split mortise in each leg is created 
by ripping stock down the center, dadoing half 
the mortise out of each piece, and regluing. 

served as the blank from which the 
leg was cut (see the Full-size Pat- 
tern between pages 16 and 17). 
Again, pay attention to the grain pat- 
tern: Matching grains help make a 
panel look seamless. Use dowels or 
biscuits to keep the parts aligned, 
and apply enough clamping pressure 
to close the joint tight, but not so 
much that you end up squeezing out 
all the glue. 

When the glue has cured, tem- 
porarily attach a copy of the Full- 
size Pattern to one face of each 
panel (use two-sided tape or spray 
mount adhesive), and carefully cut 
just outside the lines with your band 



saw. Then, using a drum sander in 
your drill press or an oscillating spin- 
dle sander, sand clown to the lines. 

A Pegged Tenon Stretcher 

Any pro will tell you that, when 
milling several operations on a single 
part, he starts with the most difficult 
one. That way, if he makes a mis- 
take, he'll only be out a board, 
instead of a board and a lot of time. 

The most demanding cuts on the 
stretcher (piece 2) are the tenons on 
either end. Begin by laying out these 
tenons according to the drawing 
below. Note that the tenons are not 
quite the full height of the mortises 
you've already cut in the legs. This is 
because wood moves more across 
the grain than along it, and the 
tongues must be allowed to expand 
and contract. 

I formed my tenons using a cross- 
cutting jig like the one featured in 
the March/April 1993 issue of 
Today's Woodworker, but an accu- 
rately set miter gauge will also work. 
If you opt for the miter gauge, attach 
an auxiliary extension fence to its 
face to support this long workpiece. 

Begin by defining the cheeks and 
shoulders (as shown in Figure 2) 
with a sharp, fine-toothed blade. You 
can switch to a dado head to remove 
the rest of the waste. Use scrap wood 
to set the blade for a centered tenon 
before cutting into your workpiece. 

Diy fit each tenon in its respective 
mortise (See Figure 2, inset) mark- 
ing the hole locations for the stretch- 




Figure 2: Dry fit the 
stretcher in the leg mortises 
to ensure a perfect fit, To 
define the tenons, use a 
sharp, fine-toothed blade, 
and then reveal the cheeks 
with a dado set. 



er pegs (pieces 3). Now drill a 3/8" 
hole for each peg - using your drill 
press to ensure a 90° hole - then 
fashion the pegs (see the Full-size 
Pattern) by cutting them to length 
and forming the ends with your belt 
sander. Test the fit by installing the 
pegs in your leg and stretcher 
assembly. 

Remove the stretcher and use your 
band saw and belt sander to create 
the gentle curves on the ends of the 
tenons as well as the curved profile 
down the center of the stretcher (see 
the Full-size Pattern) . With that 
done, it's time to turn your atten- 
tion to the seat boards. 



Note that the 

stretcher's tenons are 

not quite the full 

height of the mortises 

in the legs. This 

allows the tenons to 

expand and contract 

with seasonal 

changes. 




Today's Woodworker January/February 1997 



MATERIAL LIST 




1 Legs (2) 


TxWxL 

1^"x16%"x16%" 


2 Stretcher (1) 


13fS"x4#' x39" 


3 Stretcher Pegs (2) 


3/8" x 3" Walnut Dowel 


4 Seat Center (1) 


7/8" x 4%' x 45" 


5 Seat Edges (2) 


7/8" X 534" X 44%" 


6 Seat Screws (10) 


#8 x 2'A" Square X 



7 Seat Plugs (10) 



3/8" x 1/4" Walnut 



© 



We 



J® 



Fashioning the Seat Boards 

Ideally, the three seat boards 
(pieces 4 and 5) should be cut from a 
single wide board, so that their grain 
forms a pattern extending all the way 
across the seat. If that's not possible, 
find three boards that match well. 

Use the Full-size Pattern to lay 
out the profile of each board, then 
make all the straight cuts on your 
table saw. While the boards are still 
rectangular, cut dadoes in the under- 



side of each (see Full-size Pat- 
tern for dimensions) where the 
legs will join the seat. Check your 
cuts by dry fitting each board to 
the legs as you go. Make the 
curved cuts on the seat edges with 
your band saw, finishing with a 
drum sander in the drill press. 



MEET THE CRAFTSMAN 



From Hogs . 



A native of Fairmont, Minnesota, Greg 
Wood got started in the work world by 
putting his degree in agriculture to use 
on an 800-acrc hog and grata farm. Six 
years of slopping pigs got him thinking 
about his first career change and that, 
somehow, led to flying. He spent the 
next five years as a pilot for a regional 
airline, but then found himself looking 
for a new direction again. 

"I found that flying was taking me 
away from home quite a bit," Greg 
explained. "I wanted to try something 
that would let me be at home more 
often, to choose my own hours, I got 
tired of missing the holidays with my 
family, and all the football games and 
hockey games that the kids (sons 
David, Nathan and Ian) were in." 

Tli rough a process of elimination, 
Greg narrowed Ids choices to either red 
deer farming or woodworking. After 
careful consideration, he opted for the 
latter. His choice may have had some- 



Now use the Full-size Pat- 
tern to locate the screw holes 
in the top. I turned the seat 
boards upside down and cen- 
tered my 3/16" pilot holes in 
the dadoes. Then I flipped the 
boards back and used a 
Forstner bit to create the 
counterbores on the top. I rec- 
ommend using the drill press for 
both operations. Dry assemble the 
whole bench and use a portable drill 
(switch to a 1/8" bit) to extend the 
pilot holes into the tops of the legs. 

Final Assembly and Finishing 

Before final assembly, you'll need to 
install a 3/8" radius roundover bit in 
your router and soften the legs 
(except their top edges) and the 




Figure 3: Most of the edges of the split mortise bench are rounded 
over with different bits prior to final assembly. 



stretcher (except its tenons), as 
shown in Figure 3. Now switch to a 
1/4" radius roundover bit and do the 
same with the seat boards (being 
cautious around the dadoes). 

Glue and clamp the stretcher to the 
legs, wiping off any excess glue with 
a wet rag, then tap the pegs into their 
holes. Now line up your pilot holes 
and attach the seat boards to the 



... to Hand Tools 



thing to do with the fact that a single 
breeding doe costs $2,500, and a buck 
can run in excess of $10,000! 

"1 enjoyed woodworking in high 
school," Greg told us, "and I was pretty 
good at it. I began to pursue the idea 
that I could make a living doing this." 
So he and his wife, Kris, agreed to give 
this new business five years to make it. 
That was in 1993. 

'The last year has been good," Greg 
continued as he stood in the middle of 
his workshop, a converted 30' x 60' 
barn. "I'm optimistic, I've had some 
success with a line of outdoor furniture, 
and I hope to develop and market it 
more, I also do a few custom pieces 
along with that." By his own reckoning, 
Greg has two years left before he has to 
take a critical look and decide if his 
new business can sustain itself. 

Greg's workload is keeping him in 
the shop 50 to 60 hours a week, but 
he's still not ready to call it a success. "I 



don't think I would have tried this if we 
didn't have another income," he said, 
pointing out that Kris has been a 
tremendous source of financial and 
emotional support. "She stands behind 
me, and gives me input. We had some 
money saved up, and knew we 
wouldn't have a lot of discretionary 
income from the business for at least 
three to four years. All the money I've 
made has been put back into the busi- 
ness, buying tools, machinery and 
shop fixtures, and covering marketing 
costs." 

Greg's first custom woodworking 
revenue came from University of 
Minnesota (and later NFL) kicker Chip 
Lohmiller, who purchased a bench, two 
chairs and a coffee table. These days, 
about 65% of his sales are outdoor 
furniture, and his favorite species is 
Honduras mahogany, which he con- 
tends isn't really as expensive as many 
woodworkers think. 



legs, using #8 screws (pieces 
6) instead of glue. Remember 
to check that your assembly is 
perfectly square as you go. 

When everything dries, glue 
the seat plugs (pieces 7) in 
their counterbores and sand 
them flush. Continue sanding 
everything down through the 
grits (I go all the way to 360), and 
then tack cloth the entire bench 
before applying a sealer and five top- 
coats. Be sure to sand between coats 
with 400 grit paper, 
■ 

Greg Wood designs and builds furni- 
ture in Dutch Lake, Minnesota. For a 
complete brochure call (320) 543-2944, 




He favors oil finishes (Gillespie's 
tung oil for indoors and Deks of Olje 
for outdoors) . The latter is expensive 
and takes about six hours to treat one 
piece. But it doesn't yellow and because 
it's thin, it gets into nooks and crannies. 

On the power tool front, Greg's Delta 
table saw gets the heaviest workouts, 
followed by a Powermatic jointer and 
planer. This craftsman's favorite hand 
tools are a spokeshave and a pattern- 
maker's file. "I like cleaning up saw 
marks with the spokeshave," he said. 
"Besides, I favor any tool that helps me 
cut down on my sanding." 



JIGS & FIXTURES 



Dry Assembly Clamp 



By John English 



i PRINT THIS ARTICLE 

J MAC USERS SEE "READ ME' FILE 




MATERIAL LIST 




1 Fixed Jaws (2) 


Tx W x L 

3/8"x1"x6" 


2 Moving Jaws (2) 


3/8" x 1"x6" 


3 Bar(1) 


1/4"x1tf'x12" 


4 Wedges (2) 


1/4" x 1/4" x 15i" 


5 Pins (2) 


1/4" x 1" Dowel 


6 Pads (2) 


1/4" Thick Cork 



1/2" Brad 



flea markets are great places to waste a lazy Sat- 
urday morning, and on occasion they pay big div- 
idends. I found the dry clamp shown at right 
(appropriately being used to build our replica), 
buried in a pile of broken planes at a local flea 
market. On the original, each jaw was made 
from a single piece of hardwood and a through 
mortise was cut to accept the bar I opted for the 
easier split mortise, making the jaws in two 
halves and cutting dadoes into each before assem- 
bly. Then I added dowel pins to strengthen the 
joint between the fixed jaw and the bar. I also 
made an extra long dry clamp (the bar dimen- 
sion was changed to 48") and it has quickly estab- 
lished itself as one of the more popular tools in my 
shop. It's like having an extra set of hands when it 
comes to dry-fitting those larger projects! 





Step 1 : Rip hardwood scraps to 3/8" thickness to 
make the jaw halves (pieces 1 and 2). Tight 
grained hardwoods such as maple and walnut 
work best, but any strong, straight stock will do. 
For safety reasons, rip halfway through a wider 
piece for your first cut (as shown above), and 
then lay the piece flat to cut it to width. 



Step 2: Draw a starting line 151" to the right of the 
blade on your miter gauge fence and add a finish 
line VA" to its right. With the end of a fixed law at 
the starting line, cut out the mortise to a depth of 
1/8", as shown above. For the larger mortise in 
the moving jaw, draw two more lines, each 3/16" 
further out, to accommodate the wedges. 



Step 3: Glue the two halves of each jaw together 
before cutting them to shape. Spring clamps 
supply enough pressure to snug the halves 
without excessive squeeze out. To keep glue out 
of the mortise, Insert a piece of scrap exactly 
the size of your bar into the opening and slide it 
out before the glue dries. 




m 

Step 4: Use a photocopy 
of the Full-size Pattern 
at left to lay out the profiles of the fixed and 
movable jaws, making an awl mark at the two 
pin locations. After cutting the jaws to shape on 
your scroll saw, try a 1" drum sander in the drill 
press to refine the curves, and a belt sander to 
true up the straight edges. 



Step 5: The moving jaw 
is locked in its travel 
along the bar (piece 3) by a pair of map lb wedges 
(pieces 4). Scroll saw these wedges to rough 
shape, (see pattern at left) and use a small belt 
sander or a file to refine the cut. Be sure you 
don't over-sand the wedges or they'll lose their 
locking action. This has to be a tight fit. 



Step 6: Glue the bar into ^" 

the f i xe d jaw, c hec k in rj '' 

for squareness. Drill the holes for the pins (pieces 
5), glue them in place and sand flush when the 
glue dries. Glue the cork (pieces 6) to the jaw 
faces and apply your finish. Slip the movable jaw 
and wedges onto the bar and tap a stop (piece 7) 
In place near the end of the bar. 



Today's Woodworker January/February 1997 



Ch PRINT THIS ARTICLE 

JpV MAC USERS SEE "READ ME" Fllf 



The CD Cabinet: A Modern Classic 




Concertina doors and pop-in hardware provide 
easy access to an amazing 120 CDs. 

By Stan Schmidt 



.' 






I ver dinner one 
evening, my wife, 
/ Rosie, suggested 
/ that I build a storage 
cabinet to organize our 
growing CD collection. She said that 
things were in a sorry state because 
the CDs were mixed in with a bunch 
of old LPs. Then our youngest, Dou- 
glas, asked, "Dad, what's an LP?" 

Thanks, Doug, I really needed that! 
Nevertheless, we did come up with a 




wall-mounted storage cabinet that 
hides a ton of CDs behind a clever 
concertina door system. 

Selecting and Cutting Stock to Size 

Even though this is a fairly small pro- 
ject, there are a lot of pieces 
involved. In addition, some of these 
are hardwood and others are ply- 
wood. This creates some grain 
matching challenges that should be 
addressed early. As such, I recom- 



mend cutting all the pieces to size 
now, saving your best stock for the 
sides, the bottom shelf and the 
doors. You'll find the dimensions for 
all of this cabinet's parts in the Mate- 
rial List on page 26. 

With the parts cut to size, the first 
stage in actual construction is to mill 
the sides (pieces 1). Their bottom 
edges are contoured {see the Full- 
size Pattern between pages 16 and 
17 for the shape), and this is done on 



January/February 1997 Today's Woodworker 



the band saw. After cutting both 
pieces, use a drum Sander in your 
drill press to refine the cuts. 

Install a 1/2" straight bit in the 
router table and cut stopped dadoes 
in each side (one each for the shelf, 
top rail and bottom rail), using the 
dimensions shown in the drawing at 
right. Stopping these dadoes is just a 
matter of lining up pencil marks on 
the fence and workpiece. 




Figure 1: Router bits leave rounded inside 
corners on stopped rabbets anil dadoes. These 
can be squared off with a sharp chisel. 

The next milling operation on the 
sides is the creation of rabbets that 
will eventually house both the ends 
of the shelf support (piece 2) and the 
back of the cabinet (piece 3) . These 
rabbets stop 1" from the bottom 
edge (see drawing at right), so you 
can use the same router table setup 
as you used for the stopped dadoes. 

The last bit of milling required on 
each side is a 3/4" wide rabbet that 
will accommodate the ends of the 
hanger cleat (piece 4). Then square 
the inside corners of all the stopped 
rabbets and dadoes with a sharp 
chisel, as shown in Figure 1 above. 

Avoiding Stopped Dadoes and Rabbets 

I didn't relish the idea of squaring up 
14 more small stopped dadoes (for 
the dividers) , so I opted for an easier 
approach that allowed me to cut 
through dadoes instead. That's why 
the rails each feature two pieces. I 
also avoided quite a few stopped rab- 
bets on the ends of the rails and shelf 
with this simple technique. 

The sides are connected by both 
top and bottom rails, and a shelf. All 
are made from plywood (pieces 5, 6 



and 7), edged with solid hardwood 
(pieces 8, 9 and 10). To ensure that 
the seven dadoes for the dividers 
(pieces 11) line up properly, position 
the top and bottom rails together, 
edge to edge, then lay out and cut 
both sets of through dadoes at the 
same time (following the dimensions 
in the Pinup Shop Drawings) . 

Continue the milling process by 
creating the 1/2" wide tongues on 
the ends of both rails and the shelf. 
The shelf also needs a rabbet along 
the back edge to accommodate the 
cabinet back (see the Pinup Shop 
Drawings for dimensions). 

Before you attach the three lengths 
of hardwood trim to the shelf and 
rails, you have to mill a rabbet at the 
back of the top rail trim, which will 
later house the door track (see 
Pinup Shop Drawings for dimen- 
sions). With that completed, shape 
the shelf trim on the band saw and 
use glue and clamps to secure the 
trim to the plywood shelf and rails. 

Making the Shelf Support 

Start making the shelf support by 
cutting the rabbets on each end and 
then add the curved profile (see the 
Pinup Shop Drawings) using the 
band saw and drum sander in the 
drill press. You'll also have to notch 
each end of the shelf support (see 
Pinup Shop Drawings for dimen- 
sions) so that it fits around the ends 
of the slopped rabbets on the sides. 
Use a 1/4" or wider blade on the 
band saw (see Figure 2) to make 
these cuts. 





Figure 2: The ends of the shelf support are 
notched to fit into stopped rabbets in the sides 
of the cabinet. This is done on a handsaw, using 
a 1/4" or laryer blade for a straight cut. 



Dividers 

The clear ph..,. 
cases that protect CDs f" 

aren't that big, so you don't 
need a lot of space for the pop-in 
holders (pieces 12) that hold them. 
That's nice when you want to orga- 
nize a lot of CDs, but it also presents 
a small problem: The holders are 
screwed in place, and you can't drill 
pilot holes for the screws after the 
cabinet is assembled, because 
there's not enough room for a stan- 
dard drill. With the dividers cut to 
size, take a few minutes to locate 
these holes (see the Pinup Shop 
Drawings), and drill them now. 

Close quarters also cause another 
small problem: You need to drill two 
large holes in each outside divider 



Today's Woodworker January/February 1997 




1 Sides (2) 


TxWxL 

3/4" x 8" x 24" 


2 Shelf Support (1) 


3/4" x 3%" x 39'// 


3 Back (1) 


1/4" x 18K" x39!f' Ply. 


4 Hanger Cleat (1) 


3/4" x 2W x 3Q%" 


5 Top Rail (1) 


3/4" x 6%" x 39«" Ply. 


6 Bottom Rail (1) 


3/4" x &%" x 39K" Ply. 


7 Shelf (1) 


3/4" x &A" x 39'^" Ply. 


8 Top Rail Trim (1) 


3/4" x1"x 3854" 


9 Bottom Rail Trim {1 ) 


3/4" x1"x38%" 


10 Shelf Trim (1) 


3/4" x 1!*"x38M" 


11 Dividers (7) 


1/2"x6X"x 13// 


12 Pop-in Cd Holders (6 pr.) 


Plastic, 6K"x 11 7 A" 



14 Screws (9) 


TxWxL 

1 %" x #6 


15 Screw Plugs (6) 


3/8" Hardwood 


16 Cove Molding, Front (1) 


3/4" x 1"x42" 


17 Cove Molding, Sides (2) 


3M"x1"x8T 


18 Doors (4) 


3/4"x9 5 ^"x12 5 i"Ply. 


19 Edging Tape (4 rolls} 


1 " x 6' Cherry Plyedge 


20 Main Hinges (2 pr.) 


120° Full Overlay 


21 Center Hinges (2 pr.) 


Butterfly Style 


22 Concertina Hinges (2) 


23 Track (1) 


5/8" x 13/16" x 38%" 


24 Pulls (4) 


White Ceramic 



25 Pull Plates (4) 



Polished Brass 



13 Top{1) 



3/4" x 9%" x 42%" 



now, so the door hinges can be 
screwed in place later on. The loca- 
tions and dimensions of these holes 
are on the Pinup Shop Drawings. 
Use a Forstner bit to drill these large 
holes in the dividers: They cut the 
cleanest edges. 

The only other milling that needs 
to be done to the dividers is the cre- 
ation of tongues on their top and bot- 
tom edges. Return to the router table 
for this operation (see Figure 3), 
using the Pinup Shop Drawings to 
lay out your cuts. 




Figure 3: Use a small straight bit in your router 
to cut the opposing rabbets that form the 
tongues on the CD tlivi tiers. 

Making the Top and its Molding 

The top of the cabinet (piece 13) is a 
solid cherry board that you have 
already cut to size. It will be screwed 
to the sides through its top face. The 
screws (pieces 14) are sunk below 
the surface and capped with wooden 
plugs (pieces 15). Use a Forstner bit 
in your drill press to counterbore for 
the 3/8" hardwood plugs, then 
switch to a 3/32" standard bit to 
make the clearance holes through 
the rest of the top. 

For centuries, woodworkers have 
been topping off tall furniture and 
cabinetry with crown moldings, and I 
saw no reason to break with that tra- 
dition. I did, however, amend the 
technique, substituting a 3/4" x 1" 
cove molding (pieces 16 and 17) that 
was more in keeping with the scale 
of this project. 



The safest way to make this mold- 
ing is to install a cove bit in your 
router table and cut the profile on 
the edge of a board that's about 
three inches wide. Then rip your 
molding to width on the table saw. 

Use Plywood for the Doors 

Solid wood inset doors are notorious 
for expanding and contracting, which 
of course can lead to serious prob- 
lems down the road. To avoid this 
problem, I decided to make both 
pairs of doors (pieces 18) from cher- 
ry plywood, matching the grain pat- 
terns in each pair. 

To disguise the edges of the ply- 
wood, I applied cherry hardwood 
veneer tape (piece 19) , then sanded 
it flush with the plywood. With that 
done, I gave all of the parts a thor- 
ough sanding prior to beginning the 
assembly process. 

Starting the Assembly 

Dry fit all of the parts Qohn English's 
Dry Assembly Clamps on page 22 
would work perfectly!) and make any 
adjustments that are necessary. 
Then glue and clamp the cabinet 
together in the following sequence, 
checking for squareness as you go. 

Begin by attaching the dividers to 
the top and bottom rails, then attach 
this subassembly and the shelf to the 
sides. Add the shelf support (a few 
3d finish nails driven in from the 
back will help here, but make sure to 
predrill for them or you'll split the 
cherry). Now position the top, 
extend the pilot holes and screw it to 
the sides. Complete this step by 
plugging the holes and sanding flush. 

Miter the cove molding and install 
it below the top with 3d nails, apply- 
ing a little glue on the mitered cor- 
ners as you go. Then glue and screw 
the hanger cleat in place (Note: a lot 
of weight will be carried by this 
piece!) and you're ready for finish- 
ing. The hardware for the bi-fold 
doors (pieces 20, 21, 22 and 23) is 
installed after finishing, and instruc- 



CD Storage Cabinet Hardware 

The hardware kit for the CD Storage 
Cabinet includes two Concertina door 
systems, the track and six pairs of 
pop-in CD holders. We are offering 
the plugs and Piyedge in oak or cher- 
ry, and are listing the ceramic knobs 
and brass backplates separately in 
case you prefer another style. 
To order, call Today's Woodworker's 
toll-free number: 1-800-610-0883. 



36782 (Hardware Kit) 

20891 (SO Cherry Plugs).... 

20842 (so Oak Plugs) 

19497 (6' Cherry Piyedge) . 

19406 (6- Oak Piyedge) 

36087 (VA" Knob)' 

35931 (1" x 4" Backplate)*. 



$79.95 

$2.69 

$1.79 

..$0.99 each 
.$0.99 each 
$3.95 each 
.$2.75 each 



'More options are also available from 
The Woodworkers' Store: 1-800-27&-4441. 



tions for that process can be found in 
Hardware Hints on page 8. Before 
you move on, drill the holes for the 
screws that hold the pulls and plates 
(pieces 24 and 25) in place. 




Figure 4: Holes are nre-ilrilleil for the pop-in CD 
holders prior to assembly. A short haiulleu 
screwdriver comes in handy for final installation. 

Finishing Up 

I applied cheny stain to the cabinet 
to even out the color, then sprayed 
on a sealer and three coats of matte 
lacquer (sanding between coats with 
400 grit paper). Next I installed the 
pop-in CD holders (see Figure 4) 
and completed the case by nailing 
the back in place with small brads. 

Be sure you find at least two studs 
when installing your new CD cabi- 
net. The spot we picked is right 
above the shelf where we store our 
old LPs, so now Douglas has to 
reach across history every time he 
wants to hear that racket he insists 
on calling music. 



Today's Woodworker January/February 1997 



WHAT'S IN STORE 



"Why 

By Stan Schmidt 



't-l-think-of-that" Solutions 



Our hats are off to our friends at 
American Woodworker for pulling 
off two excellent shows in 1996, one 
in Chicago and the other outside 
Philadelphia. The latter drew almost 
150 exhibitors and 12,000 attendees. 

What's in a good show? Fantastic 
opportunities to meet fellow wood- 
workers; rub elbows with big names 
like Patrick Spielman (Pat's latest 
book is reviewed at right), Mike 
Dunbar, Toshio Odatc and Ian Kirby; 
and get your hands on new tools and 
products. Of course, a really good 
show is awful hard to leave without 
buying something. 

The exhibitor list included some of 
the biggest names in the industry 
(like Delta, Powermatic, Jet, DeWalt, 
Bosch, Porter-Cable, Ryobi, Makita, 
Milwaukee, Sears Craftsman and 
American Tool). I spent a little time 
at their booths and then made my 
way through saw blade and router bit 
manufacturers like Freud, Amana, 
Forrest, CMT and Eagle. I couldn't 
resist checking out the latest from 
some of the top jig and fence design- 
ers, like Leigh, Excalibur, Incra Jig, 
Keller, Kreg and Veritas. I also met. 
representatives from Total Shop, 
Laguna, Campbell Hausfeld, Wood- 
master, Hegner, Shopsmith and 
American Clamping. It was, to say 
the least, a couple of vety busy week- 
ends. Look for the latest from many 
of these companies (like Craftsman's 
new radial arm saw guard) in tutu it 
What's in Store columns. 



Seen on the World Wide Web 

http; //www.f ixitfuy.com 
Just cut that board a 1/3" too 
short? Missed the nail hut not your 
thumh? Then take a break and 
check out the Fix-it Guy Home Page, 
What's a Fix-it Guy? There are two 
definitions, male and female (sorry, 
no hints). Here you'll also find the 
Fix-it Guy Poem '0 the Month 
(December's poem: "Fumes can be 
hazarduss"); amazing (and hopeful- 




A Re-engineered Finish Nailer 

My first exposure to pneumatic nail- 
ers was about 15 years ago helping a 
friend build a garage. That borrowed 
framing nailer was big, heavy and 
not the safest tool with a trigger, but 
it saved huge amounts of time and 
labor. Today's nailers are lighter and 
much safer, I recently put a Porter- 
Cable FN250A finish nailer to the 
test installing baseboard, win- 
dow and door trim in the shop 
I'm building. Porter-Cable re 
engineered this 16-gauge nailer, 
reducing the weight to 4 pounds, 
increasing the range of nail sizes it 
can handle (3/4" to 254") and adding 
an adjustable depth guide, an 
adjustable muffled exhaust and a 
rubber soft-grip handle. Most impor- 
tant, the non-marring rubber tip lived 
up to its label. The nailer didn't jam 
once, and I'd guess it chopped in half 
the installation time on about 350' of 



]y) true life tales of how fix- it guys 
use and abuse duct tape, super glue, 
cable ties, lubricant spray and more; 
a business directory of real Fix-it 
Guys across the country; the Fix-it 
Guy Home Repair Tip; and, yes, 
some real home repair and emer- 
gency medical care links. If you 
want to share your amazing true 
tale, here's your opportunity. 



trim. The FN250A kit (street price: 
$220) conies complete with a plastic 

rase, 1 ,000 '.','■" nails, an adapter for 
3/4" nails and a 1/4" male quick cou- 
pler. 

Why Didn't I Think of That! 

Mobile bases are essential for any 
small shop, but there's always been 
a roadblock: you had to spend about 
$100 or more for a specially- 
designed base for each tool or stand. 
Delta International Machinery 
has a "Why-did n't-I-think-of-th at!" 
solution. The universal mobile base 
- with a 300-pound capacity and a 
street price of $60 - comes with cor- 
ner brackets, wheels, caster assem- 
bly, hardware and foot pedal. You 
supply the hardwood rails 
sized to fit your needs. 




Short Takes 

Sears is introducing a new Crafts- 
man 12^" portable thickness planer 
($430) that features a snipe-reducing, 
four-column design (the old version 
had only two columns); it comes with 
a 14-amp, 2hp motor and feeds stock 
at 26 feet per minute ... Woodwork- 
ing teachers/authors Joyce and John 
Nelson and Mike Dunbar have 
joined forces to create Scroll Saw 
Central at Dunbar's 2,400-sepiare- 
foot shop in Hampton, New Hamp- 
shire. For more information, contact 
Sue Dunbar at Dept. TW, 44 Timber 
Swamp Road, Hampton, Nil 03842 
(phone; 603-929-9801). 




"The Art of the Lathe" 

Patrick Spielman's latest book 
(Sterling Publishing Co.) is a 
"must have" for anyone hooked 
on wood turning or just thinking 
about trying out a lathe. It's filled 
with 27 projects from 39 top 
woodturners. All the projects 
and designs are photographed 
in full color - and that alone 
makes this book worth the 
$19.95 price. Spielman starts 
with some basics on the lathe 
itself, tools, sharpening, stock- 
holding, wood, sanding, finish- 
ing and safety. Then he gets 
down to the good stuff, projects, 
including his own simple cutting 
board, Nathan Roth's chess set, 
Judy Ditmer's earrings, Dick 
Sing's two-handled mirror, and 
Robert Rosand's Christmas tree 
topper. Each project contains an 
exploded view, dimensions and 
construction instructions. But 
Spielman doesn't stop there; the 
last chapter (60 pages!) is a fas- 
cinating gallery of woodturnings 
by such artists as Philip 
Moulthrop, Bob Stocksdale, 
Rude Osolnik, Ray Allen, John 
Woolier, Linton Frank, Bonnie 
Klein and Eugene Sexton. 

WHAT'S IN STORE HOTLINE: If 
you know of new tools, hard- 
ware, books or World Wide Web 
sites, contact Stan Schmidt at 
Today's Woodworker, P.O. Box 
261, Medina, MN 55340. E-mail: 
editor@todayswoodworker.com 



Classified Rate: $40 minimum for 25 
words; $1.50 for each additional word. 
Payment must accompany order. Send 
copy and check/money order to: Clas- 
sified Marketplace, Today's Woodworker, 
Box 261, Medina, MN 55340, Or Fax 
copy to 612-478-8396 and use a credit 
card. Display classified rates start at 
$1 15 per inch: call Jill Arens, 612-478- 
8305 for more details. Deadline for the 
March/April issue is January 23, 1997. 



HAND TOOLS 



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The package (item #37467) is available 
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Have something to sell? 
Place a classified advertisement in 

Today's Woodworker 

CLASSIFIED 

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Call Jill Arens Today! 
(612)478-8305 



Today's Woodworker January/February 1997 




SCROLL SAWER'S CATALOG - Thin 
Hardwoods - Hardwood Plywoods - 
Baltic Birch - Oison Blades - Plexiglas - 
Scrollsanders - Much More!! Catalog 
$1.00 - Sloan's Woodshop - 5542 
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END GRAIN 



Caribbean Craftsmanship 




Challenging, but First-rate Projects 

Here's a couple of snapshots of pro- 
jects I built from plans in Today's 
Woodworker magazine. The early 
American dresser is from issue 37 
(January/February 1995). This was a 
most challenging project which I made 
out of mahogany and a local hard- 
wood, wild tamarind- Then I tackled 
the Shaker vanity mirror and bench, 
both from issue 4 1 (September/Octo- 
ber 1995). Your magazine is first rate 
and contains many varied and pleas- 
ing things to build. Also, at some time 
in the future, a tool review of drum 
sanders would be appreciated. 

Harry B. Sands 
Nassau, Bahamas 
TWW responds: Check out the 
oscillating spindle sunders that are on 
the market today. They're more 
expensive than ordinary drum 
sanders, but they've become a lot more 
affordable in the last couple of years. 
Once you try them, you '11 be hooked by 
their performance. 

Why Use Spanish Cetiar? 

/ am starting a custom line of 
humidors. It seems that most "quality" 
humidors are lined with Spanish cedar. 
Why Spanish cedar and not aromatic 
red cedar, or some other cedar? Is it 
just a fad or status thing? I have asked 
some real hard core cigar smokers 
and they don t seem to know, other 



Subscriber Harry Sands built these 
challenging projects from plans 
featured in back issues of Today's 
Woodworker (see page 17 and the 
order form for the full selection). 



than maybe Spanish cedar emits an 
aroma that is desired in the taste of a 
good cigar. 

Jan E. Lee 
jellyjams@usa.pipeline.com 
TWW responds: According to the 
Cigar Smokers FAQ (Frequently 
Asked Questions) on the Internet, 
Spanish cedar (cedrela odorato) is a 
mild wood with good absorption 
characteristics. Aromatic cedar 
(juniperus virginiana) is a pungent 
wood with varying absorption rates 
and is quite brittle. Honduran 
mahogany, similar to Spanish cedar 
in appearance and absorption, is a 
good substitute, but neither humidor 
liner should be finished. Tire Cigar 
Smokers FAQ can be found at: 
http://www.penneliamp.com 
/bc/ascfaqfaq 
, ■ 

Please send your letters and photos 
to: End Grain, Today's Woodworker, 
P.O. Box 261, Medina, MN 55340. You 
can also reach us by E-mail at: 
editor® todays woodworker, com 



January/February 1997 Today's Woodworker 



Home Office Solutions 



The most complete collection of 

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The best Shelving Jig 
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cealed, ballbearing, low profile... we 
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computer desk design. 
Call with your specifications; 
mention this ad and SAVE 15%! 



Order today at 
1-800-279-4441 

Or call for a FREE catalog 
with our complete selection! 

Plus, shipping and stale lax where applicable 
Department 63400 



urapcs 

TheLJCUr, 
Woodworkers' 
Store 

Home of 
tioodworkers' Club of America 



Offer valid at 

Arlington Heights, IL 
Buffalo, NY 
Burnsville, MN 
Cambridge, MA 
Columbus, OH 
Cleveland, OH 
Denver, CO 
Detroit, Ml 



retail stores! 

Milwaukee, Wl 

Maplewood, MN 
Minneapolis, MN 
Minnetonka, MN 
San Diego, CA 
Seattle, WA 
Tukwila, WA 



http://woodworkerstore. com 



OK, Hold It. 




Now Spread 'Em 




The innovative POWER PRESS™ Pipe Clamp, from the makers of QUICK-GRIP© Bar Clamps, is more 
than just a pipe clamp. By simply reversing the two movable clamping sections, it quickly becomes a 
spreader. Perfect for all kinds of woodworking applications, the POWER PRESS Pipe Clamp can do 
anything a regular pipe clamp can do, only faster. It works on both threaded and unthreaded pipe. And 
two lubber pads keep gripping surfaces from marring your work. The most versatile pipe clamp to hit 
the shelves, the POWER PRESS Pipe Clamp is going to revolutionize the way you work. 
Look for it wherever quality tools are sold. 



dowerPi 



merrress 



ANERtCANTOOL 

[-fi—ICOMfmitES,INC 



FROM THE MAKERS OF QUICK-GRIP® BAR CLAMPS 



) 1995 AAGJHGANTOOL U.S. and Foreign Utility and Design Patents Issued end Pending. 



USA. 




These patterns will print as a series of 8.5" x 11" sheets 
with alignment guides around the edges of the sheets. 

To achieve the best results during alignment, use a straightedge 

and an X-Acto knife or utility knife 

to cut along the edges of the outside box. 

Then, assemble the pieces using the alignment guides 

placed along the borders of each piece 

and secure with transparent tape. 




Look for this icon on each sheet, then use 

the key below and the alignment guides to 

determine proper arrangement. 



SPRINT THESE PATTERNS 
MAC USERS SEE "READ ME" FILE 




VIEW THESE PATTERNS^ 






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